Mike's Home Page

Posting here because I can't find the original thread, and got a "reply" notification. 

Backstory:  This is all part of the complete meltdown and retardery around the A10, almost always by people who have no fucking clue what they're talking about.

In the thread, someone once again did the "just convert them for carrier use and give them to the Marines. Simple," retardery someone in my previous thread claimed was a straw man. Funny, I hear that several times a week, obviously from retards.  While we're at it, why don't we simply redesign it to be supersonic and convert into a giant battle robot?  Seriously, go fuck yourself, shit for brains. You're retarded. (I'm repeating that word because retards are slow learners.)(If the use of the word "Retarded" offends you, go fuck yourself.)

Then another idiot chimed in, about how "we need the A-10 to avoid friendly fire."  Except that, oh, wait---the A-10 has had friendly fire incidents, too. http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2015/02/05/a-10-john-mccain-iraq-afghanistan/22931683/  In fact, it tops the list.  Next time, have a fucking clue what you're talking about, or at least do some googling.

Then I got this response:

Brian Wheaton mentioned you in a comment.

Brian Wheaton
October 29 at 10:33am

Michael Z. Williamson Weather itss called bule on blue, friendly fire, or fratricide doesn't mater to the recipient. The Army has required spotters to observe the fall of shot for inderect fire, yes it still happens. To address your retort more directly the Air Force does not nor has it ever required an observer on the ground, I will point and laugh if you mention ALOC, since you mentioned artillery which do you think accout for more dammage and loss of life since WWII stary artillery or air drop ordnance?

~~~

Okay, Brian, let me see if I can parse your comments:

Yes, targeting errors occur in war. It's war.  We agree. Moving on:

Wait, so YOU want the support, YOU call for the support, but you expect SOMEONE ELSE to doublecheck your math?  Hey, thanks for admitting Airmen are smarter than Soldiers! 

BTW, you're wrong.  There are at least two USAF AFSCs devoted to providing fire support to the Army--Tactical Air Control and Combat Control. And the Army can have them pretty much any time it asks.  If they don't ask...so now you're demanding the USAF tell the Army how to do its mission? Well, seeing as you're trying to tell the USAF how to do theirs, at least you're consistent. And yet, when told the A10 won't be around much longer, you then get all smart and try to tell the USAF how much you know about CAS aircraft.

So, wait, after a steady diet of "The Infantry is the only part of the military that matters," we're now being told, "As long as a bunch of other people help us do the job"?  Well, yes.  EVERYTHING is a team effort, which, when you work with expensive aircraft or ships, you know instinctively. Fifty people can cause an aircraft to crash even before it leaves the ground, and I suspect hundreds of Sailors could each have the opportunity to fuck up a ship, because I suspect the Navy doesn't take anyone aboard they don't need, given the cramped quarters and resource consumption.

The difference being, ship drivers and pilots are typically respectful to their teams and appreciate their support.

But frequently, some grunt (ASVAB requirement: 31) comes along and tries to tell everyone smarter (almost everyone), and frequently stronger (better than half) than he is how they're complete shit and don't matter.  It would be insulting if the speaker was smart enough to matter. As it is, it's just cute watching them go past full retard all the way to rutabaga.  No, it's not ALL infantrymen, but 7 times out of 10, that behavior is an indicator. The other three, it's someone who either wanted to be a grunt and couldn't, or is trying to white knight for them.

As to your last comment, air power has caused more casualties and damage. That's what it's for. So, you're admitting the USAF is superior to the Army in that respect.

Now, we can very roughly divide war into two components--A: smashing the enemy. 2) causing them to accede in person.  The first we do with lots of bombs, the second with boots on the ground.

That, added to your bleats, supports once again my theory that the Army should be incorporated into the USAF as a Ground Corps, much like the Navy has the Marine Corps. First, the USAF will smash the enemy, then it will send its ground corps in to secure things. And since they'll be in the USAF, they won't be able to bitch about how the USAF doesn't support them.  But I'm sure they still will.

Basically, if the USAF provides support, you'll bitch, and if they don't, you'll bitch, and if they don't provide it exactly the way you think it should be done, even though you have no fucking clue how it's done, you'll bitch.

I guess my only advice is to stop being a little bitch.

And stop trying to tell people who are smarter than you how to do their jobs.

Not the answer you wanted? Well, too bad.

I expect now you'll threaten to never read my books, or never read them again.

I'm cool with that.

Okay, first let's look at the numbers of combat aircraft in the USAF:

F-16 Fighting Falcon General Dynamics F-16C/D    982
A-10 Thunderbolt II Fairchild Republic A-10C         280
F-15E Strike Eagle McDonnell Douglas F-15E         219
F-15 Eagle McDonnell Douglas F-15C/D                 193
F-22 Raptor General Dynamics F-22A                    186
B-52 Stratofortress Boeing B-52H                           78
B-1 Lancer Rockwell B-1B                                       62
F-35 Lightning II Lockheed Martin F-35A                 47
AC-130 Lockheed & Boeing AC-130U/W/J                27
B-2 Spirit Northrop Grumman B-2A                         20

 

See that? The A-10 is the second most numerous model, third most numerous airframe (since both F-15 variants are on the same frame).

Does that sound like something they're "trying to get rid of"?

Now, I keep hearing the same ignorant, and sometimes idiotic, comments about this, fueled by internet outrage, emotional stories, and instant expertise.

"The Air Force refuses to do CAS for the Army."

Really? In what battle did the Air Force refuse to do this? Please name the event, date and location.

"The Air Force wants to get rid of the only plane that can do CAS."

Really? What do the Army, Marines and Navy use for CAS, since they have no A-10s? What do other NATO allies use?

"The Air Force should be ordered to design a replacement."

You're an idealistic idiot and that's not how that works. The USAF doesn't design craft.  First, it holds a forum to determine needs, which costs money and takes Congressional approval. Then, it takes the needs to Congress, and begs them for money for R&D. Then, it has contractors submit proposals, and has Congress assign money to develop prototypes. Then it tests the prototypes. Then it picks one, begs Congress to bless it, then begs them for money to build it.  Then, Congress blames the cost on the AF, counts the R&D into the production cost, claims the production cost is too high, halves the numbers, complains the per unit cost has doubled, halves it again, complains how expensive new planes are, and cancels the project. And it takes 20 years.

BTW, we DO have such a replacement. It was even designed with the participation of the Navy and Marines. It's called the F-35. Oops.

"The Soldiers love the A-10, so the Air Force should be made to keep it."

Okay, and? Since when does a grunt's personal desires dictate air doctrine? HINT: Never.  Marines liked the battleships for beach support.  The Navy still got rid of them when they got old.

Then we get into really stupid territory.

"The Air Force should just give it to the Marines. They want it."

A: Cite, please, the USMC document stating their interest in this platform.

2) The Marines vastly prefer aircraft that are carrier capable, for forward deployment.  This leads to the response of:

"So just put carrier landing gear on it and make the wings fold."

a} You don't "just" put carrier gear and folding wings on an airframe. It has to be DESIGNED for such. Even if it is

II] that adds a LOT of weight to the frame, typically about double, which reduces your payload, so you wouldn't have an A-10 anymore, and

C. it would cost a CRAPTON of money.

V| how do you think, btw, the Marines do CAS now, if they have no A-10s? Possibly they use other aircraft?

Then we go full retard.

"The Air Force should be made to give it to the Army."

Okay.  So, assuming you revoke the Key West Agreements and give it to the Army, what then?

Hey, Army, that sure is a nice looking plane you have there. Looks GREAT!

Oh, right...the Army doesn't have any fixed wing CAS pilots. I wonder where they'll get those?

Oh, you think USAF pilots will just transfer right over and take the Army's bullshit to fly the plane?  (All branches have bullshit, but they're used to USAF bullshit, and prefer it, or they'd have gone Army in the first place.) Well, SOME Hog drivers will, they love the plane that much. But others will say, "Fuck it, I'll go back to Vipers."

So, the Army will have to get trained pilots. And who will train Army pilots on the A-10? OH, right--USAF pilots. And that will take a year or so.

So, now they have planes and pilots...and where do they fly these planes from? Army FOBs are sorely lacking in runways.

Now, if you were stupid enough to propose this idea, you're probably stupid enough to think some poured concrete and planks makes a runway, and I'm going to laugh in your face.

Where is the Army going to get trained airbase engineers?

So, either beg, borrow, or steal them from the USAF, OR, add enough Army engineers to do the job, AND have the USAF train them in how to build airbases.

Get that? You have to ADD PERSONNEL to the Army to do this. And the USAF isn't going to lose any personnel, which I'll come back to in a bit.

Then, you need jet mechanics, airframe specialists, aircraft electricians, pneumatics-hydraulics specialists, life support equipment, munitions, PMEL and NDI specialists, ground support...

And all those troops need support troops--medics, supply, cooks, etc.

Some can be cross-trained from existing Army fields, but you'll still need more of them.

You're going to build 10 Expeditionary Air Wings for the Army.

And then you're going to give them a single 40 year old airframe that, best case, is going to retire in 13 years, and only does one mission, and the rest of the time, sits there as a target while the support element sits there waiting.

Oh, yeah--more MPs.

I've even heard from Army aviation troops where the Infantrytards wanted to pull them off duty, "park" the helos and just fire them up when needed. If you don't understand why that doesn't work, you probably are the type of person who proposed the idea above, so it would take too long to explain why you're an idiot.

More importantly, there's a very good chance you're in the Army, and have Dunning-Krugered yourself enough to think that operating aircraft is SIMPLER than driving trucks and shooting rifles (Yes, I was in the Army, I know there's more than that, but I'm responding with a like attitude. How does it feel?).  Thanks. You've proven EXACTLY why we have the Key West Agreement and why the Army doesn't get to manage the Air Force.

Now, coming back around--it's ONE craft that does ONE mission. It was the best plane in the world at busting tanks, 40 years ago. It was one of the best at busting bunkers, movements and positions, 40 years ago.  But that's all it does, and it's no longer as awesome and unique as it was.

You see, other aircraft can do those missions. Sometimes they have to overlap, but those craft also do other things, and the A-10 does not. So, the USAF will keep all its existing personnel for its other aircraft.  All you'll have done is driven up Army costs and complexity.

These days, CAS is done by A10s, F16s, F15s, AC130s, B52s, occasionally B1s, but not, as far as I know, by B2s. It's done by Navy and Marine FA-18s, AV-8Bs, EA-6s, Marine and Army AH-60s, AH-64s, AH-1s, and various UAVs. Smart munitions make a lot of difference.

Now, let's look at the F-16. It has this cute trick where, if you try to attack it during its CAS mission, it suddenly goes supersonic, locks onto you, and splashes you with Sidewinder air to air missiles that it pretty much always carries for just such an emergency.

The A-10, in similar circumstances, has this cute trick where it calls for an F-16.

Which means your Army CAS wing would need a USAF fighter wing to cover its ass while it did its mission, assuming a modern enemy with an air force.

And if you're not fighting a modern enemy with an air force, you probably don't need A-10s to blow them up, most of the time.

It was originally designed to bust tanks in the Fulda Gap, when we were outnumbered 25:4.  The plan was to go in slow, low, blow stuff up, take a lot of fire, duct tape back together, take more fire, and hope the aircraft lasted long enough to reduce the tank numbers so the Army could handle what was left.  It wasn't expected to survive, just to die with style.  And "Close" in this case is about 4000 yards. That's what the gun is indexed for.

Forty years later, neither the Russians nor Chinese would let an A-10 get that close. They know what it can do, and they have much better air defense.  You're going to have to send high performance fighters anyway, and stand off and lob missiles. In which case, the fast movers can lob the missiles, and you don't need an A-10.

Oh, sorry, did you say "BRRRRRRRRRT!"?  That's not quite the sound it makes, actually. It's more like a farting dragon. But it also turns out that if you get that close, you don't usually need 30mm to punch holes, and if so, Maverick missiles do it from 20 km away, and if you really think you need to get close, UAVs are cheap and don't risk pilot lives.

Now, are there missions for which the A-10 can't be replaced? Yes, a few. The combination of slow and lots of hardware does have its place (helos require more maintenance, have less loiter time, and smaller payloads).

But, then we come to budget.

The USAF is tasked with some essential but non-combat missions. Heavy strategic airlift, theater airlift, nuclear deterrence, intel and reconnaissance, refueling, transport.  Those all move material and people into and around the war zone, and deter our enemies.

The combat missions roughly break down to interdiction-strike, interception, air superiority, and close air support. Four main categories.

So, hypothetically, if you have four missions, ten planes per mission, you have forty planes.

Then you get told your budget is 35 planes.

The strike craft can do CAS.  The air sup can be equipped to do some, as can the interceptors. But, the CAS craft can't do ANY of the others.  If you have to get rid of 5 birds, it's going to be the ones you can't cross-deploy. It's simple numbers. An F16 is not an ideal CAS platform, but it can and has done it. It can also intercept, strike and maintain air superiority.  An A-10 cannot intercept, cannot do air superiority, and can do strike, but not long range (not quickly enough to matter in most engagements) and not without cover from the others.  There is ONE recorded air-to -air kill by an A-10, of a hovering helicopter. Against any kind of modern fighter, it is steak.

You want to keep the A-10? The USAF needs more budget.  Cut some of those handouts to non-productive people and put that money back into defense (and roads, and schools, and science, but DoD for this argument) and they can fly more missions with more aircraft.

Now, the USAF will continue to fly the A-10 for the next several years. And even when it doesn't, it will cheerfully kill anything the Army paints with a laser or has a JTAC identify. Because blowing shit up is cool.

It was doing that before the A-10 existed, and will do it afterward, and will probably do it better in the future.

But it won't be with the A-10 for long, because even though there are older aircraft, most of them don't take the heavy pounding of low altitude, high-G maneuvers, nor as many sorties.

In the meantime, new gunship packages are being developed to put even more firepower into them. They shoot sideways and poop bombs out the back ramp.  Expect to see a lot of that doing CAS.

Now, the F-35 is almost an air parallel to the M-14 rifle. The M-14 was intended to replace the Garand, the Browning Automatic Rifle, the Thompson, the M3A1 Grease Gun and the M1 Carbine.  In the end, it was a so-so replacement for the Garand at 3X the unit cost, but didn't do anything else worth a damn. It seems no one learned from that history.

The M-14 was a terrible replacement for the BAR, and all hopes had been pinned on it.  It failed.

But we still got rid of the BAR.  It was old, it no longer was as awesome as it had been in WWI, so it went away.

The M-60 was probably a terrible choice to replace the BAR. It was a general purpose machine gun, not an automatic rifle.  But it's what we had.

So the A-10s replacement, if not the F-35, will possibly be some cobbled together C-17 Globemaster with forward firing 105mm howitzers.

I Met One Of Those People
Dec 18, 201308:30PM

Category: Military

I was at the Christmas Party for the Indiana Filmmaker's Network and the state film commission.  And my badges says I'm a military consultant, among other things.

Grizzled Old Fat Guy With Beard:  "What qualifies you to be a military consultant?"

Me:  "Lots of research, and 25 years of service."

GOFGWB:  "What branch?"

Me:  "Army and Air Force."

GOFGWB:  "Oh, I'm sorry."

The following went through my head in .0035 seconds.

Gee, let me guess, you used to be a Marine, right?  One term of service, four years, in a support MOS, during the Cold War, with no trigger time, nor even any time in anywhere remotely hot.  And you never actually did anything with the Air Force, you just want to jerk your dick about how you were once a Marine, trying to recapture the glory that 80 lbs and God knows how much booze has stolen from you.  I mean, I've been downrange twice, in support, and don't make a big deal about it, and cleaned up after a major national disaster, and put in 6 years active and 19 Reserve, including a bunch of extra duty I didn't need to, as well as volunteering for said mobilizations.  I'm Retired Reserve, still subject to recall, and can still meet the physical requirements and pass the PT test for both branches. But you used to be a Marine.  So I guess that shows me.

Two minutes of polite conversation proved I batted 1.000.

Hey, Usetabe:  Fuck you.

No, they didn't.

I just had to cover this with friends who don't believe me.

The story is bullshit from beginning to end.

Okay, NSA information may be in the public domain. It remains, however, "classified." If you download it onto a computer, they can, in theory, have a problem.

This doesn't matter to most users.

_IF_ you have a gov't computer or contract computer with NIPRNET access, you MAY put the stolen classified information onto your secure USAF computer.

At this point, there has to be a nerd slapfight between USAF computer security, assuring NSA computer security, that the information has been removed. USAF can't let NSA search its classified data, and NSA can't take their word for it, and can't tell USAF exactly what is at risk.

IOW, nobody wants to do the reams of paperwork involved in a menage a trois security leak that probably isn't anything to worry about anyway.

So they're saying, "Don't use your controlled access to reference ANYTHING to do with this case."

It's closing the barn after the horse escaped, but it's a necessary CYA.

Feel free to contact the unit (it's a single unit) PAO and ask for clarification.

Oh, and watch for black helicopt

Some People Are...Dumb
Mar 26, 201211:49AM

Category: Military

On the military.com fora*, in regards to the disappearance of DADT, someone shared this gem of insight:

26419217 said:
Mar 21, 2012 12:55:17 PM
There is not an Okay from the commander, that destroyed two complete cities for their openess to GAY lifestyle. If you have Men & Women, that will not fight next to a person with that idea, then you have a hole in your defenses. The enemy has won the battle because the people that will not fight, will shoot their fox hole mate before defend their line. I ,for one, would shoot the person in the defence line if he looked or said something that calls for a romantic response. I am not Gay and will not save a Gay person. I will pray that God does not allow me to be in that situation. I pray for their(GAY) eyes to be open and leave that style of death

~~~

If I were a praying man, I'd pray for your god to teach you literacy, comprehensibility, logic and tolerance.

Even as a non-praying man, I'll pray that, if you actually are in the military, your subordinates' gods give them the gift of tongues to understand what the hell it is you think you said.

~~~

Seriously, I'm at a loss for the ecclesiastical, logical and grammatical content of this comment.  All I can say is, if they allow gays in the military, what's next?  Women?  Blacks?  Mexicans?  INDIANS?

*BTW, half the people on those fora have never served.  The other half are big damn heroes with 27 decorations for bravery armed only with a toothpick, and proud of it.

Because He Deserves No Less
Sep 30, 201110:13PM

Category: Military

PFC Dan Gronde was the victim of an I.E.D in Afghanistan on July 24th. He suffered fragmentation wounds to his abdomen and back. His buddy suffered knee damage. With a very grateful and troubled look he tells me feels lucky. Most of the casualties in his unit's area suffer limb loss or death.

Dan is on medical leave here in Indianapolis, and got treated to a meal at Chili's. He didn't realize that while he ate, a small crowd of family, friends, vets and even a member of the Young Marines were gathering outside to greet him.

There were cameras, hugs, handshakes and Dan graciously accepted all of it, looking a bit embarrassed at all the attention.

Then it was time to go to the Legion Hall, with a police escort. There are lots of ways to travel in style, but his family found something unique. Dan is a big fan of Batman.

Mark Racop of Logansport builds officially licensed 1966 Batmobiles.

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Quite a few thousand locals must have wondered what kind of emergency required the attention of police, Batman and Soldiers.

I have to admit, it was fun being in one of the chase cars, watching people pull over, and the expressions on faces, especially of young men in their rice burners. Sorry, son, but no matter what you do to your Honda, it will never be as cool as a 1966 Batmobile.

The Legion had their own greeting ready.

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Dan was very gracious and modest, with strangers and children, and was a gentleman with maturity and manners far beyond his 20 years.

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By the way, just in case you ever wondered, the secret to the Batmobile is a Chevy engine

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And rockets for backup

Please extend wishes of recovery and good luck to PFC Gronde, and thanks to Chili's, the Zionsville Police and Fire Departments, the American Legion, and Mark Racop of www.FiberglassFreaks.com.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/07/technology/07identity.html?partner=rss&emc=rss&pagewanted=all

"ZOMG! SSANs are used for identity theft! This was unforeseeable and is an insoluble problem!"

Dear general: Way back in the Dark Ages, about the time YOU came into service, they assigned everyone a "service number" for military functions. It is not an SSAN and is no use outside the military network. There, I've solved your problem for you. Dumbass. Turn in your star.

~~~~

Also, Gail's unit Christmas party was last weekend. They rented an American Legion hall. It not only allows smoking, it had had a HUGE smoking event the night before. It not only had a huge smoking event the night before, it had bad ventilation. I walked in, smelled humidity, mustiness, mildew, and smoke. It was still hazy.

Well, second hand smoke was always an issue for me, even when I smoked. It's chemically different and pervasive. Now, of course, I'm asthmatic, and generally fine...unless I walk into a cloud of smoke.

We keep the kids out of smoke-filled establishments.

Gail is allergic to the additives in cigarette smoke (actually, so am I. A good cigar or pipe side smoke doesn't bother us at all. Just fags for addicts).

I walked in, choked, started to react, got out fast, held the door for the cooks to take everything in, waited outside.

Gail explained, they released us, and we got to drive 100 miles home with no party.

Adding insult to injury, they're now angry with her.

So, she actually had to quote them this:

DOD Instruction 1010.15
3. DEFINITIONS
3.1 DoD Facility. Any interior space owned, rented, or leased by the Department of Defense.
3.2. Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS). Also referred to as "secondhand" or "passive" smoke. Exhaled and/or sidestream smoke emitted from smokers and the burning of cigarettes, cigars, and pipe tobacco. A major source of harmful indoor air pollution, designated a "Class A carcinogen" by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and known to cause respiratory illness and heart disease (refer to NIOSH CIB54
and the EPA Report, references (e) and (f)).
4. POLICY
It is DoD policy, under references (b) through (d), that smoke-free DoD facilities be established to protect all DoD civilian and military personnel and members of the public visiting or using DoD facilities from the health hazards caused by exposure to tobacco smoke.


AR 600-63
7-3. Policy for controlling tobacco use
a. Tobacco use is prohibited in all DA-occupied workplaces except for designated smoking areas, as authorized by DODI 1010.15, Smoke-Free DOD Facilities. The workplace includes any area inside a building or facility over which DA has custody and control, and where work is performed by military personnel, civilians, or persons under contract to the Army.
j. Smoking policy specific to MWR and Army lodging facilities is addressed in AR 215-1. MWR facilities include fitness and recreation centers, Armed Forces Recreation Center hotels, cabins and campsites, clubs, bowling centers, and so forth.

AR 215-1
13-15. Safety, fire prevention, and health programs
d. Smoking.
(1) Smoking in MWR facilities will be in accordance with AR 600-63. All DOD civilian and military personnel will be protected from the health hazards caused by exposure to environmental tobacco smoke.
(2) Enclosed designated smoking areas must be exhausted directly to the outside, located away from air intakes, and maintained under negative pressure sufficient to contain tobacco smoke in the
designated area. Employees will not be required to enter such areas during normal business hours while environmental tobacco smoke is present.

~~~~~

Once again, cigarette smoke seems to affect the cognitive functions of smokers. "I can't smell it because I've destroyed my olfactory nerves, and I enjoy wallowing in toxins, so I don't notice a problem. Therefore, there is no problem, and as long as no one sees the cigarette in my hand, all is dandy."

These must be the same morons who smoked in their parents' houses and insisted no, really, there wasn't any smoke.

Yes, there was. After three minutes in that place, we had to wash her black poly, because it had soaked up so much smoke it lingered for a hundred miles.

And this means everyone in the chain of command was equally unaware of regs they make everyone aware of from Day One, callous about it, and willing to argue the point.

I call it like I see it: MORONS.

More VA Adventures
Nov 09, 201001:17AM

Category: Military
I was heading for Jack's today to help with some cleaning and shoving.

He sounded bad on the phone. By the time I got there, he was convulsive. So his neighbor (A stunningly gorgeous disabled vet) and I shoved him into my van and I hauled him to the VA, while Gail brought the Buick from the other direction, because my van will not fit in a 6'8" parking rampand there's no outside parking to speak of.

I hauled him out in a heap at the Emergency ramp, and three people went sprinting for wheelchairs. Gail arrived and swapped vehicles.

It wasn't a long wait, and we have another visit on file. Doc came in, prescribed a painkiller and an anti-anxiety shot. Pulse came down from 85 to 61, BP from 160/85 to 120/75.

Jack was unable to communicate beyond nod and shake and mumble. I can translate reasonably well in context. Even a dim red penlight on his pupils elicited moans and thrashing.The observation room was dark, curtain drawn, and he still had a towel over his eyes. The trip in sunlight had to be excruciating.

He did not remember how he got there, or the shots from the hot blonde nurse.

I took him home two hours later, giddy on what he calls "hippie drugs."

The good news: He's well documented as having seizure episode headaches. He can go to his primary care physician to renew the previous scrip, which worst case should mean they mail him drugs, best case means I go in with him next week and talk to the doc about little details--such as the diagnosed "depressive order" and something else are possible, but I think the CRIPPLING CONVULSIVE HEADACHES might need priority.

Also, the Patient Advocate may be able to assist in expediting things.

This is all part of dealing with a federal bureaucracy, which most of us can figure out with effort, but when you're in screaming pain, asking "help" and being told, "we don't do that here, go see X" is a brick wall.

Also, someone active duty hunted up the regs for me. Diagnosis of a "personality disorder" requires professional testing by a pshrink. The Army did not do this, and apparently doesn't in about 40% of cases. A number of assholes in a number of units use it as a convenient excuse to toss people they don't want to do with. There's supposed to be some kind of accounting on this, but I imagine they'll all play dumb and weasel out of it, the @#$%ers. So, with that in hand and an actual doctor, I'm hopeful the @#$%ing @#$bag @#$er who stripped his benefits, who is neither an MD or a Pshrink, will have the relevant paperwork folded to all corners and shoved up his ass, with backpay of relevant benefits.

Because my friend does not have a "personality disorder." He's had a migraine that's lasted 4 years and occasionally spikes into convulsions that are at least a 12 on the "how bad does it hurt?" scale, and he cannot @#$ing work because he cannot reliably think, balance, leave the house in daylight, or be sure he won't collapse on the street, to be hauled off to the charity hospital, as has happened several times.

Is his personality hard to deal with? Yeah, I imagine it is. I call that a "Symptom," not a "Diagnosis."



Mike

VA Help For A Friend
Nov 03, 201007:36AM

Category: Military
Here's the summary:

While serving in Germany, Jack took ill with recurring, debilitating headaches. Bad enough he'll wind up on the floor in convulsions for hours at a time. Bright light (daylight) and chemicals can trigger this.

The Army and the Germans were unable to identify a cause.

Do to a misunderstanding of this, his command decided it was a "personality disorder," and that he was malingering, and processed him for discharge.

After several months, VA initially decided to award disability.

He's stayed at my house at times, and I've seen him on the floor, incoherent and twitching. Anything brighter than a night light can do it. He wears welding goggles to go outside in daylight.

For some reason, the VA never actually assigned him a primary care physician.

Recently, some administrative assbag did the same thing the Army did, and with no medical exam or credentials, ruled it to be a "personality disorder." His benefits are gone.

Because his brain doesn't work right, Jack had no savings.

On appeal (they sent the paperwork to an old address, and he never saw it in time to argue at the time), they scheduled a medical appt.

Because his brain doesn't work right, he missed the appt.

They have now ruled that he's not only not disabled, but not entitled to ANY VA care at all, unless he can "prove" he has headaches by coming to their hospital, which he can't do since he's not authorized VA medical care, and because when a headache hits he can't make a phone call.

DAV has been unable to assist.

He's agreeable to a durable POA so I can access the ER records from the places he's been taken when he's been found on the street during an attack.

What agencies and what strategy do we use to get him covered?

What non-VA options does he have, such as social security, etc?



Mike
GaryBelch
Oct 21, 2010 6:37:16 PM

I totally disagree with allowing homosexuals to openly serve in the
military. There are many assignments in all of the branches that would
not see much of an impact if the gays were able to serve openly. But,
on the other hand, so many of our positions and assignments would make
it a very uncomfortable and possibly unsafe for all concerned. For
example, as a new private out of boot camp you arrive at your first
duty assignment and your roommate is openly gay. I personally would
have a very difficult time sleeping at night or sharing the latrine
with this individual. Another example with the same private; the
openly gay individual brings his gay lover to his room for a visit...I
could not handle this, because now I'm being teased by others unit
members that I must be gay also. As I mentioned before there are
situations where there wouldn't be much of an impact, but a lot of the
military is not your typical 9-5 job at Wal-Mart. We have to work,
eat, sleep, shower and live together 24-7.


"Oh, god, they might TEASE me!!!!"

Fucking pansy.

I mean, really. "My roommate is a repressed and hated minority, very visible and taking all kinds of flak, but FUCK HIM! People might tease ME!!!!!"

This clown claims to be a retired E8. Possible, I suppose. Douchebags do get promoted on occasion.

But he should also be aware that they try to place like roommates together, and allow swapping of rooms--people who like loud heavy metal tend not to room with those who like country or rap. Smokers and non-smokers try not to room together. Ditto with straights and gays.

I assume he had a very nice, pleasant, desk-bound career where he never had to share a tent, fighting position or bus with females. After all, it would have made him uncomfortable.